Go Back   Old Project Avalon Forum (ARCHIVE) > Project Avalon Forum > Global Ground Crew Networking > Australia and New Zealand

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-04-2008, 04:41 AM   #1
bowspearer
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Central Coast, Australia
Posts: 34
Default Bush Tucker

After reading this thread, I'm wondering it it might not be a bad idea for us to work out what bush tucker is available to us in wherever we decide to set up our communities.
bowspearer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2008, 05:50 AM   #2
munkey
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: just outside the box next to the box you where thinking outside of
Posts: 143
Default Re: Bush Tucker

bush tucker would be relative to regional location,
Kangaroos live all over Australia, Grass trees live in dry areas and palms like coconut live in the tropics around the coast.
not only bush tucker should be learnt, but also bush medicine.
munkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2008, 07:18 AM   #3
bowspearer
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Central Coast, Australia
Posts: 34
Default Re: Bush Tucker

But that's exactly my point- we need to work out where we'll all be so we can work out what's regionally available. With the Codex A in place (although considering our population issues are the reverse, it'ss likely we may well be spared from the effects), I'd suggest all ground crews here work outu exactly where we're planning on forming communities A.S.A.P. so we can determine what resources will be available locally, and plan around it.

Stockpiling food is a novel idea, however portability would be an issue and ultimately it becomes a very stort term solution. Working with resources local to hwere we set up communities is the arguably our best shot at long term sustainability.
bowspearer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2008, 09:22 AM   #4
munkey
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: just outside the box next to the box you where thinking outside of
Posts: 143
Default Re: Bush Tucker

one thing I would do is to start growing a few vegtables at home from seed and then let them go to seed, collect those seeds from your own plants,
very easy to store dried seeds in small air tight containers.
even if you want to be self sufficient with bush tucker, you may also want to throw a few seeds around an area to get more diversity to a diet.
Not planted in rows like a market garden, but rather seeds thrown around your safe area.
Pumpkins, water melons, cucumbers tomatoes and sweet potatoes as well as normal potatoes just to name a few.
the reason behind this is if a roaming band of (bad guys) come in and destroy a crop, you will still have easy to access food in surrounding areas.

no one really knows what will happen in the future, but we should be prepared for all eventualities.
munkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2008, 07:53 AM   #5
Tez
Retired Avalon Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Where there is light
Posts: 138
Default Re: Bush Tucker

"An Internet WebQuest on Aboriginal Use of Native Plants"

Australian Aborigines managed to live successfully in Australia for 40,000 years before white man invaded, making use of what was available around them for food, medicine, shelter and utensils. The early white settlers learnt much from the local people but gradually that knowledge was lost as more familiar exotic species and alternative technologies were introduced.

http://science.uniserve.edu.au/schoo...iveplants.html



Tez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 11:58 AM   #6
Lindsay
Avalon Senior Member
 
Lindsay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: South Australia
Posts: 12
Default Re: Bush Tucker

Just another good reason why we should be more respectful of the Aboriginal people of this land. I have said this many times to people I know, we are all human, how could you not pay serious respect to humans that had managed a sustainable lifestyle in this inhospitable land for 40,000+ years? When the Sh*t hits the fan there will still be people who will disregard the only real survival opertunity they might get via their own belief that they know better. Here's my big tip for the day.... you want to know how to survive in this country through any event that mother nature can throw at you? ............ask and aboriginal Australian, then be prepared to get dirty and give him a hand, if you are white (like me) he may just forgive you and say "sure thing brother, just follow me"
Lindsay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 12:13 PM   #7
Robski
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 71
Default Re: Bush Tucker

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsay View Post
............ask and aboriginal Australian, then be prepared to get dirty and give him a hand, if you are white (like me) he may just forgive you and say "sure thing brother, just follow me"
I here you sister. Our indigenous people of this land have preserved our home to which the new colony has simply created unsustainable living using non-renewable resources.

It's highly overdue to respect the love of our home, Terra Australus.
Robski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 12:44 PM   #8
Lindsay
Avalon Senior Member
 
Lindsay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: South Australia
Posts: 12
Default Re: Bush Tucker

I appologise if my last post appears to have a sarcastic undertone.
Although I do believe that sentiment would be justifiable to some, it was not my intention. I do believe that we need to be careful about what we think "survival" means if infact serious earth changes do occur ( and there is good reason to believe they could) We all need to be careful not to get swept up in the fantasy world of "change" that will bring about a new and wonderful world. It wont be Robinson Cruso. Realisticaly if it is sudden and dramatic it will be panic and pandamonium. If the earth starts to tremble and shake, if communications are brought down etc etc, you will be lucky to assemble your own family before you have to respond. Phsycological barrier number 1. Inital survival might just be staying ahead of the chaos until things calm down, how long is that? a day, a week, a month? who knows, if you look carefully at the turmoil that has accompanied these events in the past we are talking serious weather, serious landscape changes, I can only imagine that would mean minute by minute survival. Even basic shelter might be hard to come by. Imagine your phsycological state after a few days only. By now you are getting hungry, you didn't have time to grab your tomatoe seeds and they will take weeks to mature anyway, cockroaches are starting to look pretty good, but they are hard to catch and not very filling. See where i'm going here? I could write a book on this and still not cover the posabilities. My point is: I believe we have to think very very basic here, Bushtucker is a great idea, familiarise yourself with photo's of edible plants etc,take notice of how the Aboriginal people of this country lived successfully for all those years, prepare yourself to eat grubs and insects, because without a great deal of skill and experience you will NOT catch a Kangaroo, you will not survive while waiting for your vegie patch to mature, can you even light a fire without matches? can you get water when there is no tap? how do you keep warm without shelter? Can you overcome the prospect of being alone? basic basic skills, but not easy to execute if you are not experienced. I would suggest really looking into these skills, and actually finding and eating the bush tucker, there may be no way of learning these things if Sh*t hits fan without warning. I do agree with the collecting of seeds etc , great ideas, it's just that we should be prepared for the situation where it just dosen't happen that way, you are on your own, every man for themself, sounds gloomy I know, but I have seen how people respond when they panic, most revert to survival mode and that means they react only in the interest of self preservation. Self first, Family second, Communities last. Sorry about the rant, I like to expect and prepare for the worst, then hope for the best, hedge my bets. Follow some traditional Aboriginals around for a few days, do it their way, see how hard it really is, they have had 40,000 years to perfect a true nomadic lifestyle that most of us couldn't survive in, we are seriously gonna need their help. Unfortunately they can't plug their laptops into mulga trees and post a few tips on this thread.
Lindsay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 12:48 PM   #9
Lindsay
Avalon Senior Member
 
Lindsay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: South Australia
Posts: 12
Default Re: Bush Tucker

Cheers Robski, but I am a brother
Lindsay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 12:54 PM   #10
munkey
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: just outside the box next to the box you where thinking outside of
Posts: 143
Default Re: Bush Tucker

that is so true,
I think that people are getting the impression this is going to be a slow trasition.
Survival is the goal, I have a handy supply of seeds which are already in a bag ready to go.
this would only act as a supliment and variety while eating the bugs and lizards as well as grass roots.
I have a horticultural background so the collection of seeds and propogation comes as second nature.
spending a lot of time camping and rughing it I think has given me a little head start.
you have to keep moving in a radius so as not to exhaust your food supply as well as dropping a few seeds here or there so when you come around next time, there may be some food there, if not the fruit and vegtables, but the animals that ate them.
munkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 01:12 PM   #11
Lindsay
Avalon Senior Member
 
Lindsay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: South Australia
Posts: 12
Default Re: Bush Tucker

Good on ya munkey, I knew i could flush at least one like minded soul out.
You are spot on, if your seeds are available to you and you spread them as you go searching and surviving then you give yourself the first and most important longer term goal, surviving long enough to see your plants mature.
When you are trying to survive a day by day lifestyle any goals that are days , weeks or months out would be a very important thing for your phsycological state.
Lindsay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 01:23 PM   #12
Tez
Retired Avalon Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Where there is light
Posts: 138
Default Re: Bush Tucker

Brothers and sisters...........Aboriginal and Caucasian,

There was a great video that is worth watching if you have not already seen it, to get an idea of what firstly the Aboriginal peoples can teach about the gathering of food in this vast country of ours, and secondly to show the Caucasion races what is not known about food sourcing and preparation.


The video's were done in outback Australia, and Arnhem Land, and were part of the Ray Mears collection.
Ray Mears - Outback Survival,
Ray Mears - ArnhemLand,
Ray Mears - Psychology of Survival is also a must see. as well as the Ray Mears BBC Survival Series on Wild Food.

I had downloaded and viewed all of each series, and they are quite informational and good viewing.

Edit: Also, a good movie to watch "Rabbit Proof Fence", which shows the survival of Aboriginal children in the outback, centre of Australia, and the telepathic communication that exists with these native Australian that Caucasians have lost or no longer have.

Tez
.
.

Last edited by Tez; 10-17-2008 at 03:24 AM.
Tez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2008, 05:02 AM   #13
Zeddo
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 694
Default Re: Bush Tucker

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tez View Post
Brothers and sisters...........Aboriginal and Caucasian,

There was a great video that is worth watching if you have not already seen it, to get an idea of what firstly the Aboriginal peoples can teach about the gathering of food in this vast country of ours, and secondly to show the Caucasion races what is not known about food sourcing and preparation.


The video's were done in outback Australia, and Arnhem Land, and were part of the Ray Mears collection.
Ray Mears - Outback Survival,
Ray Mears - ArnhemLand,
Ray Mears - Psychology of Survival is also a must see. as well as the Ray Mears BBC Survival Series on Wild Food.

I had downloaded and viewed all of each series, and they are quite informational and good viewing.

Edit: Also, a good movie to watch "Rabbit Proof Fence", which shows the survival of Aboriginal children in the outback, centre of Australia, and the telepathic communication that exists with these native Australian that Caucasians have lost or no longer have.

Tez
.
.

For those who would like to download these off the net and keep them as study guides.

I only use Firefox. Go to Mozilla downloads, download the "Download Helper" function. This will plant an icon on your browsing page tool bar (using firefox, not sure if it works on I.E.).
Go here .....http://www.veoh.com/videos/v6296337e...ewType=channel

Start the movie, click on the download helper and the URL comes up in the download box, click start and there you go. If I missed any steps or you need assistance, just drop me a PM.
Zeddo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Project Avalon