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Old 12-04-2008, 10:45 AM   #1
Swanny
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Wink Quick English lesson

I've noticed that some of our American cousins here seem to be struggling with the English language.
There are a couple of things I think you need help with.

"I could care less."........ This means you care a bit, but could maybe care a bit less.

I think you mean to say.....

"I couldn't care less." ........ This means you could not care any less than you do now.

And I have also noticed some confusion with the words then and than.
For example "may be a lot sooner then we think!" that really should be a than in there.

He was happy then.
He fixed it, then left.
There are three green ones, then a blue one.
If its locked, then well need the key.

You are a better swimmer than she is.
They like you more than they like her.

But no doubt you couldn't care less about what I'm saying.
In which case
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Old 12-04-2008, 11:29 AM   #2
Simon
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

Lmao!
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Old 12-04-2008, 11:36 AM   #3
raulduke
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

Here you are good sir, I believe this belongs to you.



Here's another bloody ridiculous bit of American writing.



Can you raed taht? Apaprnelty not erveynoe can. Wreid huh?

I've noticed that usually while writing/typing something, I'm actually thinking of the next words in my head, not necessarily the one that I'm physically writing, and for some reason, that causes me to spell somewhat phonetically. For example, even though I know that I should be writing you're rather than your it just happens sometimes. I do try to proofread, but c'mon, it's an internet forum. I do enough proofreading at my day job.

Anyway, you clearly understand the actual intent when you come across one of these grammatical errors, so c'mon big deal, who cares really? We're not here for an english or grammar lesson. We've got bigger fish to fry.

Oh yeah, if we're doin' this, then I've got some corrections for you limey Brits then too!

There's no u in color, behavior, savior or humor, at least over here, u gotta be careful where you write that stuff in my hood!

p.s. I do know where you're coming from, grammar can bother me sometimes too.
It's tough in the streets for a journalism major!


Try your fresh organic salad's what exactly?

Last edited by raulduke; 12-04-2008 at 11:58 AM. Reason: grammar/spelling ahhhhh!
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Old 12-04-2008, 11:46 AM   #4
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

O.k. woops!

I just remembered that there is one u in humor, but not 2 of 'em.

That would be ridiculous!
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Old 12-04-2008, 03:36 PM   #5
Dantheman62
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

HaHa you guys crack me up!
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Old 12-04-2008, 03:46 PM   #6
Dantheman62
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Hey Swanny, we went through this on another thread, kind of, HaHa, ah you english lads and lassies, you have funny words like mum instead of mom, and learnt instead of learned, and whilst instead of while,and eveything's bloody, bloody this and bloody that, HaHa, and mate instead of friend, hmmm just stupid observations on my part but I get a kick out of it.( it was on the conkers thread )
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Old 12-04-2008, 09:49 PM   #7
KassandraLoves
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

http://www.projectavalon.net/forum/s...4062#post74062

I believe this thread has the exact same stuff.

I posted about the whole "i could care less" thing along with the "irregardless" which annoys me just as much.



p.s. that www.engrish.com site has me laughing my buns off!
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Old 12-04-2008, 10:18 PM   #8
Dantheman62
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Yeah KL, I just read that link you posted, HaHa, and the engrish.com link is funny too! Oh, hey your Kundalini is showing!, please keep it on the DL,GF LOL!
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Old 12-04-2008, 11:27 PM   #9
Antaletriangle
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

I sometimes like spelling my sentences phonetically,such as;
"I'm off ite now jack,goinna get some ales dine me neck,then av some snappin',get mesen on the bus and get me ed dine! lol.

"cosner kick a bow agin a wow an yed it til it bosses?"
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Old 12-10-2008, 09:01 AM   #10
Swanny
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

Noticed three different people saying they could care less this morning, nice to know that they care a bit

It's I couldn't careless if you don't care about something

Come on Americans try and speak properly

Last edited by Swanny; 12-10-2008 at 09:14 AM.
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Old 12-10-2008, 09:27 AM   #11
dayzero
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

I'm with you there.

Although it's unfair to just blame Americans - most English people can't speak or spell English properly either neither innit or what. Knarmean? Yeh. Srite.

Anyone remember 'How to Talk Strine' by Afferbeck Lauder?

Or the excellent Franglais series....?
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Old 12-10-2008, 02:45 PM   #12
ucan
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hehehe - this reminds me of a fantastic book http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eats,_Shoots_&_Leaves

But then again I am Welsh and think that English is backwards in the mind anyway - maybe the whole language needs a bit of a re-think http://patwa.pbwiki.com/ or is that a bit new-speak

"i'll be by there, now in a minute" - thats hows we's speaks rounds these's parts like, init.

greats posts though, thanks for the giggle, safe bra!

Last edited by ucan; 12-10-2008 at 02:48 PM.
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Old 12-10-2008, 02:56 PM   #13
futureyes
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

and what about those canadians ... EH!
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Old 12-10-2008, 05:30 PM   #14
Jnana
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

I think y'all need to consult Mr. Language Person

Mr. Language Person

Idiot's Guide to Englesh

Weird Word Problems

Some Words of Wisdomality

Examples:

Q. I have just returned from a trip to England, and ...

A. We know that. Get to the point! You're wasting space!

Q. OK, sorry. Anyway, I have just returned from a trip to England, and I noticed that the English put an extra ''u'' in certain words, such as ''rumour,'' ''humour'' and ''The Roulling Stounes.'' Also, they call some things by totally different names, such as ''lift'' when they mean ''elevator,'' ''bonnet'' when they mean ''lorry,'' and ''twit'' when they mean ''former Vice President Quayle.'' My question is, don't they have any dentists over there?

A. Apparently nout.

Q. I have trouble remembering the difference between the words ''whose'' and ''who's.'' Should I put this in the form of a question?

A. In grammatical terminology, ''who's'' is an interlocutory contraption that is used to form the culinary indicative tense.

Q. What are the mandatorical parts of speech that is required to be in a sentence?

A. To be grammatorically correct, a sentence must have three basic elements: (1) A SUBJECT, which is a noun that can be either a person, place or mineral; (2) A VERB, which is a word that describes an action, such as ''kung fu''; and (3) AN OBJECT, which is a noun that weighs two or more pounds. Let's see how these elements combine to form this example sentence, written by Marcel Proust:

"Being late at night, Earl failed to check his undershorts for lipstick stains, which is why he was awokened at 6:30 a.m. by Lurleen whanging him upside his head with a object.''

Last edited by Jnana; 12-10-2008 at 05:36 PM.
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Old 12-10-2008, 06:43 PM   #15
blastawaycas
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

MATH ANNOYS ME ..................IT'S MATHS
MATHEMATICS WHEN DID YOU ALL START USING THAT WORD
WATCHING AN OLD US WARFILM SOME TIME AGO THEY USED THE WORD MATHS........NOT MATH
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Old 12-10-2008, 07:28 PM   #16
davefla73
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

yeah I hate people that use the Word convesate, for the word converse !!!
http://www.antimoon.com/forum/posts/3805.htm
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:39 PM   #17
Metaphor
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

We who are not tounge of mother nature english, tanks yo aa lott. Grammar hard her in the third worlds of the scand of navia

He he
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:50 PM   #18
davefla73
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

I take your point, But if you are born speaking english, please stop useing the word conversate, its not a real word people..... anyways enough of my ranting sorry.
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Old 12-10-2008, 09:11 PM   #19
bodzoyfa
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

my $.02

davefla, you beat me to the punch on the word "conversate"...ha

i feel the same way so i looked it up...

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/conversate

it is a word! it is catergorized as slang, but nevertheless it is a word.

with a little perserverance, in a few years this will be added to our language as "proper" instead of "slang".

the same thing was true with words like "bling". it is now simply considered a noun. go figure!

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bling
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Old 12-10-2008, 11:26 PM   #20
Peer
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

My late father always used to make fun of the English speaking people because they write "street" and say "striet" while they mean "straat"...

How do you expect normal people (of average IQ) to understand anything you say if you make it so difficult...
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Old 12-10-2008, 11:28 PM   #21
Ammit
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swanny View Post
I've noticed that some of our American cousins here seem to be struggling with the English language.
There are a couple of things I think you need help with.

"I could care less."........ This means you care a bit, but could maybe care a bit less.

I think you mean to say.....

"I couldn't care less." ........ This means you could not care any less than you do now.

And I have also noticed some confusion with the words then and than.
For example "may be a lot sooner then we think!" that really should be a than in there.

He was happy then.
He fixed it, then left.
There are three green ones, then a blue one.
If its locked, then well need the key.

You are a better swimmer than she is.
They like you more than they like her.

But no doubt you couldn't care less about what I'm saying.
In which case
Well said that man..
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Old 12-10-2008, 11:35 PM   #22
Ammit
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jnana View Post
I think y'all need to consult Mr. Language Person

Mr. Language Person

Idiot's Guide to Englesh

Weird Word Problems

Some Words of Wisdomality

Examples:

Q. I have just returned from a trip to England, and ...

A. We know that. Get to the point! You're wasting space!

Q. OK, sorry. Anyway, I have just returned from a trip to England, and I noticed that the English put an extra ''u'' in certain words, such as ''rumour,'' ''humour'' and ''The Roulling Stounes.'' Also, they call some things by totally different names, such as ''lift'' when they mean ''elevator,'' ''bonnet'' when they mean ''lorry,'' and ''twit'' when they mean ''former Vice President Quayle.'' My question is, don't they have any dentists over there?

A. Apparently nout.

Q. I have trouble remembering the difference between the words ''whose'' and ''who's.'' Should I put this in the form of a question?

A. In grammatical terminology, ''who's'' is an interlocutory contraption that is used to form the culinary indicative tense.

Q. What are the mandatorical parts of speech that is required to be in a sentence?

A. To be grammatorically correct, a sentence must have three basic elements: (1) A SUBJECT, which is a noun that can be either a person, place or mineral; (2) A VERB, which is a word that describes an action, such as ''kung fu''; and (3) AN OBJECT, which is a noun that weighs two or more pounds. Let's see how these elements combine to form this example sentence, written by Marcel Proust:

"Being late at night, Earl failed to check his undershorts for lipstick stains, which is why he was awokened at 6:30 a.m. by Lurleen whanging him upside his head with a object.''

LMAO, Jnana
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Old 12-11-2008, 08:45 AM   #23
dayzero
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

Excellent.

And pleasant indeed to converse [or even conversate] with other grumpy pedants....rflol...

Look you, Wales, you may have a point there, back to front we are, maybe.

And have you ever heard a Canadian [or even American] say the word 'Squirrel'?
It's not a pretty sound. More like squire-hell.
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Old 12-11-2008, 10:10 AM   #24
piers2210
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Jnana, had me crying with laughter mate....
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Old 12-12-2008, 02:38 AM   #25
robyn
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Default Re: Quick English lesson

Well, I seen a hole passel of squirrels today eating there nuts way up their in the cedar tree. And I never called them squir-hells niether. I could care less then some folk, but I don't! I be trying real hard to.

They're, I think I gotten lot's of my pet grammar peves.
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