Go Back   Old Project Avalon Forum (ARCHIVE) > Project Avalon Forum > What’s Going Down > News And Updates

Notices

View Poll Results: Do you think this is being released because :
We Postively attracted it which will Ultimately lead to a "Golden Age" ! 1 7.69%
Part of the "Negative Elites" Plan ? 1 7.69%
Just got "LEAKED" out !? 2 15.38%
Other 8] 9 69.23%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 13. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-09-2008, 02:46 PM   #1
Reuters
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 69
Exclamation Unknown "Structures" Tugging at Universe

National Geographic News


Something may be out there. Way out there.

On the outskirts of creation, unknown, unseen "structures" are tugging on our universe like cosmic magnets, a controversial new study says.


The so-called Bullet Cluster of galaxies lies 3.8 billion light-years away. It's one of hundreds that have been found to be carried along by a mysterious "dark flow," an October 2008 study says.

The dark flow is caused by unknown clumps of matter outside the known universe, which are pulling our entire universe toward them, the study suggests. The report hints that, whatever may be beyond the known universe, it's like nothing we know.




Everything in the known universe is said to be racing toward the massive clumps of matter at more than 2 million miles (3.2 million kilometers) an hour—a movement the researchers have dubbed dark flow.

The presence of the extra-universal matter suggests that our universe is part of something bigger—a multiverse—and that whatever is out there is very different from the universe we know, according to study leader Alexander Kashlinsky, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland.

The theory could rewrite the laws of physics. Current models say the known, or visible, universe—which extends as far as light could have traveled since the big bang—is essentially the same as the rest of space-time (the three dimensions of space plus time).

Picturing Dark Flow

Dark flow was named in a nod to dark energy and dark matter—two other unexplained astrophysical phenomena.

The newfound flow cannot be explained by, and is not directly related to, the expansion of the universe, though the researchers believe the two types of movement are happening at the same time.

In an attempt to simplify the mind-bending concept, Kashlinsky says to picture yourself floating in the middle of a vast ocean. As far as the eye can see, the ocean is smooth and the same in every direction, just as most astronomers believe the universe is. You would think that beyond the horizon, therefore, nothing is different.

"But then you discover a faint but coherent flow in your ocean," Kashlinsky said. "You would deduce that the entire cosmos is not exactly like what you can see within your own horizon."

There must be an out-of-sight mountain river or ravine pushing or pulling the water. Or in the cosmological case, Kashlinsky speculates that "this motion is caused by structures well beyond the current cosmological horizon, which is more than 14 billion light-years away."

"We Found a Great Surprise"



The study team didn't set out to explode physics as we know it.

They simply wanted to confirm the longstanding notion that the farther away galaxies are, the slower their motion should appear.

That movement is detectable in data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), which NASA says "reveals conditions as they existed in the early universe by measuring the properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the full sky"—radiation thought to have been released about 380,000 years after the birth of the universe.

Hot gas in galaxy clusters warms the microwave background radiation, and "a very tiny component of this temperature fluctuation also contains in itself information about cluster velocity," Kashlinsky said.

If a cluster were moving faster or slower than the universe's background radiation, you'd expect to see the background heated slightly in that region of the universe—the result of a sort of electron-scattering "friction" between the cluster's hot gas and particles in the background radiation.

Because these fluctuations are so faint, the team studied more than 700 galaxy clusters.

The researchers had expected to find that, the farther away clusters are, the slower they appear to be moving.

Instead, Kashlinsky said, "We found a great surprise."

The clusters were all moving at the same speed—nearly 2 million miles (3.2 million kilometers) an hour —and in a single direction.

Though this dark flow was detected only in galaxy clusters, it should apply to every structure in the known universe, Kashlinsky said.

Explaining the Unexplainable

To explain the unexplainable flow, the team turned to the longstanding theory that rapid inflation just after the big bang had pushed chunks of matter beyond the known universe.

The extra-universal matter's extreme mass means it "could still pull—tug on—the matter in our universe, causing this flow of galaxies across our observable horizon," said Kashlinsky, whose team's study appeared in the October 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

"Strong Doubts"

Not everyone is ready to rewrite physics just yet.

Astrophysicist Hume Feldman of the University of Kansas has detected a similar, but weaker, flow.

He said the Kashlinsky team's study is "very interesting, very intriguing, [but] a lot more work needs to be done.

"It's suggestive that something's going on, but what exactly is going on? It basically tells us to investigate," he said.

David Spergel, an astrophysicist at Princeton University, echoed the sentiment.

"Until these results are reanalyzed by another group, I have strong doubts about the validity of the conclusions of this paper," he wrote in an email.

He added that, if the result does hold up, "it would have an important implication for our understanding of cosmology."

Study leader Kashlinsky agrees many questions remain unanswered. For starters: What exactly are these things that are apparently tugging our universe?

"They could be anything. As bizarre as you could imagine—some warped space-time," Kashlinsky said.

"Or maybe something dull."
Reuters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2008, 07:24 AM   #2
Humble Janitor
Avalon Senior Member
 
Humble Janitor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,201
Default Re: Unknown "Structures" Tugging at Universe

It certain fascinates me, though I do not think that we have anything to do with it directly (BUT, who knows? ).
Humble Janitor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2008, 07:23 PM   #3
Whitewolf
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Unknown "Structures" Tugging at Universe

The red text is extremely hard on the eyes. if you could re-type the thread in white or a lighter color I'll take the time to read it. Thanks.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2008, 08:11 PM   #4
capreycorn
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: switzerland
Posts: 455
Default Re: Unknown "Structures" Tugging at Universe

that`s music for the brain..
..some cosmic undercurrent due to some unknown structures...hmm
capreycorn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2008, 10:04 PM   #5
AndyH
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Ireland
Posts: 289
Default Re: Unknown "Structures" Tugging at Universe

It is indeed interesting but the very definition of "universe" is being changed a little there.

Universe means absolutely everything, all encompassing, infinite. What scientists are seeing there is matter receding at a constant velocity beyond what is perceptible with todays technology. This is slightly different than the "edge of the universe" as the universe by very definition has no edge

So there is "something" a heck of a long way off that is pulling everything towards it at 2 million mph.
Maybe it's the plughole of the universe!
A super massive blackhole even more vast (understatement tbh) than at the centre of galaxies.
Black holes are actually quite hard to spot for todays scientists. There is also the question of "missing matter" to account for current gravitational theory on a cosmic scale, currently known as dark matter.

It's a very interesting topic and you don't need to be Einstein to understand the basics.
AndyH is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
2012, bill & noval, dicovery ch., space, wilcock

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Project Avalon